If You Can’t Open, You Can’t Close

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closedthesale11-20-13Dan was hurting for clients.

A terrific business consultant and one of the top sales trainers out there, Dan’s work impressed
people.

But too many of them “disappeared”
somewhere before or after the sales conversation.

Dan read books on closing, he took courses
on closing, he even practiced closing with his
wife until his wife told him “Enough already!”

Dan memorized the classic closes, such as the “Tie Down,” the “Ridiculous,” and the “Takeaway.”

But too many clients were still melting away.

What was wrong?

Dan wasn’t setting up the close.   At all.

Why?

Dan didn’t know that the sale begins at “Hello.”

If you can’t open, you can’t close –
as much and as often as you’d like.

When Dan met prospective clients, he’d say:

“I work with small business owners up to
$25 Million to eliminate overwhelm, straighten out
their distribution and cash flow, and increase their business.”

His posts and articles were educational,
with no stories so prospects could relate.

Dan was talking all about himself and his service.

  1. Dan did not realize that his prospects didn’t care about Dan, they cared about what Dan could do for them.
  2. He was not monetizing his service for them, so they did not instantly “see” how much money he could make them.
  3. He was not showing them a huge Before-and-After gap that would impress them with his expertise.
  4. He was not putting his results into stories – the ultimate sales tool.
  5. Dan talked too much –thus shutting off any anticipation, curiosity, intrigue, and anxiety that maybe Dan had tricks up his sleeve his prospects didn’t know about.
  6. Dan did nothing to arouse feelings in his prospects, and feelings are the only way the Old Brain (the real buyer) will become interested, and the only way prospects will want “more.”

Dan was not creating desire, anticipation, and leaving his
audience hungry for more – which is the heart of superb sales.

The sale begins at “hello.”

Dan said, “I give a great service.  Why do I have to sell people?
Why can’t they just read my articles and testimonials?”

Because they’re too busy.
Because it’s a buyer’s market.
Because you have to seduce your buyer – from the word Go.

After we worked together, the light bulb went on.

Dan began to talk in the language his prospects wanted to hear.

He finally used stories:

“When I met Mark, he was working 12-hour days, struggling to
meet payroll, and too busy to grow.  Six months later he brought
in over two million, and took his family to Italy for 2 weeks.”

His clients began to feel their own pain in his stories.

And they began to see their salvation in his results.

Dan created a whole series of stories to use in order to heighten the
interest, curiosity, desire and anxiety for what he did.

He stopped taking too much.

He began to “romance” his prospects, feeding them
tantalizing bits of information in conversations and emails
that aroused their interest to a fever pitch.

By the time the sales conversation came around, there
was no need to “close.”

It had already happened.

Dan increased his signing rate by 50% and he’s still
climbing.

And he no longer worries about the close.

Thanks for reading, and tune in next time.

-Ann Convery

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